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Ming-Kai Chen, MD, PhD

Medical Oncology, Nuclear Medicine, Neuroradiology, Radiology & Biomedical Imaging
Patient type treated
Child, Adult
Accepting new patients
Yes
Referral required
From patients or physicians

Biography

Ming-Kai Chen, MD, PhD, is a radiologist in the Department of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging and co-medical director of PET Center. He has special expertise in nuclear medicine—a type of imaging that uses radioactive materials to detect and treat disease—as well as oncologic molecular imaging, which is used to take detailed imagines of the body at a cellular level to detect and monitor cancer.

“With the advance of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging,” Dr. Chen says, “we often can detect the disease at an early stage (and detect more metastatic disease) compared to convention diagnostic imaging.”

Dr. Chen, an associate professor of radiology and biomedical imaging at Yale School of Medicine, is conducting research and a clinical trial about the use of PET imaging for synaptic density in the Alzheimer’s disease.

“We hope this new PET imaging could provide early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and serve as a reliable biomarker for the evaluation of treatment response,” he says.

Titles

  • Associate Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging
  • Co-Medical Director, Yale University PET Center

Education & Training

  • Residency
    Yale New Haven Hospital (2010)
  • PhD
    Johns Hopkins University (2007)
  • Internship
    Greater Baltimore Medical Center (2006)
  • Research Fellowship
    Johns Hopkins Hospital (2001)
  • MD
    National Taiwan University School of Medicine (1996)

Languages Spoken

  • 官話 / 官话 (Chinese-Mandarin)
  • English

Additional Information

Biography

Ming-Kai Chen, MD, PhD, is a radiologist in the Department of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging and co-medical director of PET Center. He has special expertise in nuclear medicine—a type of imaging that uses radioactive materials to detect and treat disease—as well as oncologic molecular imaging, which is used to take detailed imagines of the body at a cellular level to detect and monitor cancer.

“With the advance of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging,” Dr. Chen says, “we often can detect the disease at an early stage (and detect more metastatic disease) compared to convention diagnostic imaging.”

Dr. Chen, an associate professor of radiology and biomedical imaging at Yale School of Medicine, is conducting research and a clinical trial about the use of PET imaging for synaptic density in the Alzheimer’s disease.

“We hope this new PET imaging could provide early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and serve as a reliable biomarker for the evaluation of treatment response,” he says.

Titles

  • Associate Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging
  • Co-Medical Director, Yale University PET Center

Education & Training

  • Residency
    Yale New Haven Hospital (2010)
  • PhD
    Johns Hopkins University (2007)
  • Internship
    Greater Baltimore Medical Center (2006)
  • Research Fellowship
    Johns Hopkins Hospital (2001)
  • MD
    National Taiwan University School of Medicine (1996)

Languages Spoken

  • 官話 / 官话 (Chinese-Mandarin)
  • English

Additional Information