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Genetic and molecular studies of developmental neuropsychiatric disorders

  • Study HIC#:0301024156
  • Last Updated:07/15/2021

The purpose of this study is to identify the genetic factors that cause Tourette Syndrome and tics using a family-based approach. This will greatly contribute to our understanding of Tourette Syndrome and may help develop new therapies in the future. This study requires the collection of biological samples and completion of a questionnaire from a child and both biological parents, can be done in-person or remotely, and participation will be compensated with a $100 Amazon gift card. A more detailed description of the study may be found at tourettegenes.org.

 

  • GenderBoth
  • Start Date01/31/2003
  • End Date12/31/2025

Trial Purpose and Description

The aims of this study are: 

1. To elucidate comprehensive clinical phenotypes of subjects with developmental neuropsychiatric disorders associated with cognitive and behavioral impairment. a. In subjects with disorders including autism and autism spectrum disorders, obsessive compulsive disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, and Tourette syndrome and/or related disorders such as chronic vocal or motor tics, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

2. To identify and localize genes that produce susceptibility to these disorders. a. To determine functional and expression patterns of these genes b. To examine the transmission of specific phenotypes

Eligibility Criteria

Subjects who have the diagnosis of a pervasive developmental neuropsychiatric disorders including autism and autism spectrum disorders, obsessive compulsive disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, and Tourette syndrome and/or related disorders such as chronic vocal or motor tics, obsessive-compulsive symptoms such as Trichotillomania (hair pulling) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be included.

Relatives of affected subjects will also be included

Sub-Investigators

For more information about this study, contact:

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