Macular Degeneration

ADULT AND GERIATRICS
Macular Degeneration: Saving Sight
Why Yale Medicine?
  • High success rates for retinal therapies for macular degeneration
  • Developing new treatments to reduce the risk of vision loss
  • Offering clinical trials for treatments not available elsewhere

As we age, it's important to get regular eye exams to check for a condition called macular degeneration. It's the leading cause of loss of visual acuity or sharpness and the most common cause of legal blindness for people over age 65 in the United States. 

Macular degeneration can negatively impact your life by affecting your ability to drive, read, do computer work and even recognize faces.

Yale Medicine eye specialists are at the forefront of developing better therapies for age-related macular degeneration, and they have improved their success in treating it to as high as 90 percent with some retinal therapies. 

“At Yale Medicine, our center of attention is on the patient and the best outcome for patients and their families,” says Ron Adelman, MD, director of the Yale Medicine Retina & Macula Center, and professor of ophthalmology and visual science at Yale School of Medicine.

The condition affects a spot at the center of the retina called the macula. You may not notice symptoms of macular degeneration for awhile. The first indicator of macular degeneration may be that you don't see colors as brightly or intensely or that straight lines seem warped. As the condition progresses, symptoms can include a gradual or even sudden loss of central vision. You might also perceive dark, blurry areas in the center of your vision.