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Phase I

The Brain Shuttle Study

  • Study HIC#:2000031142
  • Last Updated:09/03/2023

If you have multiple sclerosis, are not currently taking any immune medication for your MS, and are between the ages of 18 and 65, you may be eligible to participate in a free and confidential research study investigating a new method of treating multiple sclerosis.

According to the Atlas of MS study, more than 2.8 million people around the world are living with MS. There’s currently no cure for MS, and treatment focuses on managing symptoms and preventing relapses. Approved MS treatments have a limited effect on disability progression. Research suggests this may be because they are unable to reach and act on B cells (a type of immune cell) in the brain and spinal cord, which can significantly contribute to disability progression in people living with MS. There’s an unmet need for further treatment options that can reach these cells.

The B-Shuttle (BP42230) study is testing the safety and effects of an investigational drug at different dose levels. The investigational drug has been developed to try and overcome the limitations of current B-cell therapies by aiming to reach the brain.

Participants in the B-Shuttle study will have one clinic visit to determine if they qualify. They will then receive one dose of the investigational drug during a three-day, overnight stay in Yale New Haven Hospital’s research unit. There will be 10 follow up visits over the next 23 weeks. The total time in the study is up to 30 weeks, or 7.5 months.

Participants will be compensated $100 for each outpatient visit and $150 for each inpatient visit as well as travel expenses.

If you are interested, please contact Dimitri Duvilaire at Dimitri.duvilaire@yale.edu or our MS Research team at MSResearch@yale.edu.

    Contact Us

    For more information about this study, including how to volunteer, contact:

    Dimitri Duvilaire

    Help Us Discover!

    You can help our team find trials you might be eligible for by creating a volunteer profile in MyChart. To get started, create a volunteer profile, or contact helpusdiscover@yale.edu, or call +18779788343 for more information.

    Trial Purpose and Description

    If you have multiple sclerosis, are not currently taking any immune medication for your MS, and are between the ages of 18 and 65, you may be eligible to participate in a free and confidential research study investigating a new method of treating multiple sclerosis.

    According to the Atlas of MS study, more than 2.8 million people around the world are living with MS. There’s currently no cure for MS, and treatment focuses on managing symptoms and preventing relapses. Approved MS treatments have a limited effect on disability progression. Research suggests this may be because they are unable to reach and act on B cells (a type of immune cell) in the brain and spinal cord, which can significantly contribute to disability progression in people living with MS. There’s an unmet need for further treatment options that can reach these cells.

    The B-Shuttle (BP42230) study is testing the safety and effects of an investigational drug at different dose levels. The investigational drug has been developed to try and overcome the limitations of current B-cell therapies by aiming to reach the brain.

    Participants in the B-Shuttle study will have one clinic visit to determine if they qualify. They will then receive one dose of the investigational drug during a three-day, overnight stay in Yale New Haven Hospital’s research unit. There will be 10 follow up visits over the next 23 weeks. The total time in the study is up to 30 weeks, or 7.5 months.

    Participants will be compensated $100 for each outpatient visit and $150 for each inpatient visit as well as travel expenses.

    If you are interested, please contact Dimitri Duvilaire at Dimitri.duvilaire@yale.edu or our MS Research team at MSResearch@yale.edu.

    Eligibility Criteria

    • Have multiple sclerosis
    • Are not currently taking any immune medication for your MS
    • Between the ages of 18 and 65

    Principal Investigator

    Sub-Investigators

    For more information about this study, including how to volunteer, contact:

    Dimitri Duvilaire