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David H Klemanski, PsyD, MPH

Psychology

Biography

Dr. Klemanski is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Director of the Psychological Assessment Service for Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Co-Director of the Division of Quality and Innovation at Yale New Haven Psychiatric Hospital. Dr. Klemanski completed his predoctoral fellowship at Yale University School of Medicine and postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychology at Yale University. His research interests have broadly focused on delineating psychopathological components of anxiety relevant to classification of specific anxiety disorders and identification of common comorbid conditions. More recently, his research has centered on individual differences in emotion regulation strategies and treatment outcomes among anxiety- and mood-based disorders. By delineating differential regulatory processes associated with various emotional experiences, his research aims to contribute to clarification of the diagnostic overlap among these disorders.  

Dr. Klemanski regularly publishes scientific papers, speaks nationally on mindfulness and emotion regulation, and recently co-authored the book, "Don't let your anxiety run your life: Using the science of emotion regulation and mindfulness to overcome your worry and fear."  He also regularly consults for various print and online media, including MSNBC, Vice Media, and various podcasts, and he often participates in a variety of community lectures, panels, and workshops.

Titles

  • Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
  • Director, Psychological Assessment Service, Psychiatry

Education & Training

  • MPH
    Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Epidemiology (2016)
  • Postdoctoral Fellow
    Yale University (2008)
  • PsyD
    University of Hartford, Clinical Psychology (2006)
  • Predoctoral Fellow
    Yale School of Medicine (2006)
  • MA
    University of Hartford, Clinical Psychology (2004)
  • MS
    Florida State University, Education (2000)
  • BA
    Baldwin Wallace University, Psychology (1998)

Additional Information

Biography

Dr. Klemanski is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Director of the Psychological Assessment Service for Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Co-Director of the Division of Quality and Innovation at Yale New Haven Psychiatric Hospital. Dr. Klemanski completed his predoctoral fellowship at Yale University School of Medicine and postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychology at Yale University. His research interests have broadly focused on delineating psychopathological components of anxiety relevant to classification of specific anxiety disorders and identification of common comorbid conditions. More recently, his research has centered on individual differences in emotion regulation strategies and treatment outcomes among anxiety- and mood-based disorders. By delineating differential regulatory processes associated with various emotional experiences, his research aims to contribute to clarification of the diagnostic overlap among these disorders.  

Dr. Klemanski regularly publishes scientific papers, speaks nationally on mindfulness and emotion regulation, and recently co-authored the book, "Don't let your anxiety run your life: Using the science of emotion regulation and mindfulness to overcome your worry and fear."  He also regularly consults for various print and online media, including MSNBC, Vice Media, and various podcasts, and he often participates in a variety of community lectures, panels, and workshops.

Titles

  • Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
  • Director, Psychological Assessment Service, Psychiatry

Education & Training

  • MPH
    Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Epidemiology (2016)
  • Postdoctoral Fellow
    Yale University (2008)
  • PsyD
    University of Hartford, Clinical Psychology (2006)
  • Predoctoral Fellow
    Yale School of Medicine (2006)
  • MA
    University of Hartford, Clinical Psychology (2004)
  • MS
    Florida State University, Education (2000)
  • BA
    Baldwin Wallace University, Psychology (1998)

Additional Information