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Phase II

Opioid-Sparing Protocol Comparing With Opioid-based Protocol After Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

  • Study HIC#:2000031881
  • Last Updated:12/22/2022

The concern for the opioid use in the total knee arthroplasty continues to rise in recent decades. Historically, the total knee arthroplasty consumed high doses opioids in the postoperative periods. Compared to the Opioid-Based patient controlled analgesia(PCA), the opioid-sparing protocol may have benefits to decrease the concerns of the opioid use and opioid-related complication and provides the equivalent efficacy for pain control. The purpose of this trial in to provide a novel opioid-sparing protocol (OSP) to evaluate the efficacy for pain control and reducing the immediate postoperative opioid consumption.

  • Age20 years - 90 years
  • GenderBoth
  • Start Date08/24/2022
  • End Date04/30/2024

Trial Purpose and Description

The concern for the opioid use in the total knee arthroplasty continues to rise in recent decades. Historically, the total knee arthroplasty consumed high doses opioids in the postoperative periods. Compared to the Opioid-Based patient controlled analgesia(PCA), the opioid-sparing protocol may have benefits to decrease the concerns of the opioid use and opioid-related complication and provides the equivalent efficacy for pain control. The purpose of this trial in to provide a novel opioid-sparing protocol (OSP) to evaluate the efficacy for pain control and reducing the immediate postoperative opioid consumption.

Eligibility Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • patient with bilateral advanced knee osteoarthritis undergoing simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty surgery
  • willing to participate in this study and randomly allocated to either opioid-sparing protocol or PCA protocol.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • patient who refused to participate or with contraindication or hypersensitivity to any of the study drugs
  • chronic pain disorder (exceeding 50 mg oral morphine equivalence per day at time of recruitment)
  • substance abuse (e.g. alcoholism)
  • severe renal impairment.

Sub-Investigators

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