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Jay Wang, MD

Ophthalmology

Biography

Jay Wang, MD, is an ophthalmologist who specializes in vitreoretinal surgery, treating diseases that affect the retina at the back of the eye.

“I always enjoy learning about other people’s lives and have been told that I have a calming effect,” Dr. Wang says. “I went into ophthalmology because it made me excited in a way that other fields didn’t during medical school.” He was especially intrigued by the technologies and surgeries that were available for treating diseases of the eye. Dr. Wang says he was interested in the retina because it is the most interesting part of the eye, and would give him the opportunity to manage complex cases medically and surgically. Dr. Wang often sees underserved patients with disease related to diabetic retinopathy. “It’s very rewarding to help these patients see better and prevent further loss of vision,” he says.

He was recently featured in the column "Diagnosis" in the New York Times Magazine. 

Dr. Wang’s research interests include optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography (OCTA), noninvasive imaging technologies used in the care of the retinal diseases. He also collaborates with experts at Yale on machine learning, which is a type of artificial intelligence that involves programming computers to learn information without human intervention so they can be used as a clinical tool.

Titles

  • Assistant Professor

Education & Training

  • Fellow
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear (2020)
  • Resident
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear (2018)
  • Intern
    Mount Auburn Hospital (2015)
  • MD
    Harvard Medical School, Health Sciences and Technology (2014)

Languages Spoken

  • 官話 / 官话 (Chinese-Mandarin)
  • English

Additional Information

Biography

Jay Wang, MD, is an ophthalmologist who specializes in vitreoretinal surgery, treating diseases that affect the retina at the back of the eye.

“I always enjoy learning about other people’s lives and have been told that I have a calming effect,” Dr. Wang says. “I went into ophthalmology because it made me excited in a way that other fields didn’t during medical school.” He was especially intrigued by the technologies and surgeries that were available for treating diseases of the eye. Dr. Wang says he was interested in the retina because it is the most interesting part of the eye, and would give him the opportunity to manage complex cases medically and surgically. Dr. Wang often sees underserved patients with disease related to diabetic retinopathy. “It’s very rewarding to help these patients see better and prevent further loss of vision,” he says.

He was recently featured in the column "Diagnosis" in the New York Times Magazine. 

Dr. Wang’s research interests include optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography (OCTA), noninvasive imaging technologies used in the care of the retinal diseases. He also collaborates with experts at Yale on machine learning, which is a type of artificial intelligence that involves programming computers to learn information without human intervention so they can be used as a clinical tool.

Titles

  • Assistant Professor

Education & Training

  • Fellow
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear (2020)
  • Resident
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear (2018)
  • Intern
    Mount Auburn Hospital (2015)
  • MD
    Harvard Medical School, Health Sciences and Technology (2014)

Languages Spoken

  • 官話 / 官话 (Chinese-Mandarin)
  • English

Additional Information